Dog Grooming

I am excited about being a part of the staff of the Redmond Veterinary Clinic. I have always been committed to improving the quality of life for animals and Redmond Veterinary Clinic's philosophy fit well with my personal beliefs. I believe that if your family members are well groomed, there is a better likelihood that they will receive the love & affection they so readily deserve. Bonnie Sloan Groomer

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We offer bathing of all breeds of dogs and utilize appropriate shampoos for the individual pet including medicated baths if necessary 

Most dogs require bathing on an occasional basis, usually when their coat becomes dirty or when they develop a 'doggy odor'. Non shedding breeds that have no health issues usually need to be bathed about every six to eight weeks, at the time of their regular grooming. Dogs that have a heavy undercoat will benefit from bathing in the spring or fall, when they are undergoing their seasonal shedding.

How often your individual dog needs to be bathed will vary somewhat with its age, lifestyle, type of hair coat, and underlying health status as discussed above. If you have a young puppy that is just being house trained and it accidentally soils itself, there is no question that it should be bathed immediately. A dog that enjoys running through puddles or jumping into water may need a bath after a stroll through the mud or a romp in a scum-covered pond. Some dogs enjoy rubbing their head in decomposing debris in the park, or rolling in objectionable objects, and will need a bath whenever this happens so that it is allowed back into the house! Finally, if your dog has allergies, your veterinarian may prescribe frequent bathing as part of the treatment regime - with some of these dogs, daily bathing may be necessary until the problem gets under control.

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All dogs benefit from regular grooming to remove loose hairs and dead skin cells, to keep the coat free of dirt, debris, and external parasites, and to distribute natural skin oils along the hair shafts.

We offer grooming of your pet to satisfy your wants and based on the experience of our groomer.

Dogs with long, silky or curly coats require daily brushing to keep their hair from becoming tangled or matted, especially around the ears, in the armpits, or along the back of the legs. Dogs with short hair coats may require less frequent brushing. However, daily brushing of any dog that sheds will cut down dramatically on the amount of loose hair and pet dander floating around the home, and will also cut down on the amount of hair that the dog swallows in the course of self-grooming with its tongue.

Regardless of the type of hair coat, you should inspect your dog's coat every day to make sure there are no tangles or clumps that have developed under the armpits, in the groin, or behind the ears. After a romp through the grass or in the woods, it is a good idea to look for burrs or grass awns that might have become trapped in the coat and could potentially cause irritation.

If you regularly check your dog's coat and skin, you will also have a better chance of detecting any unusual lumps, bumps, or areas of sensitivity on your dog's body at an early stage. 

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When you hear the telltale "click-click-click" as your dog walks across the tile floor, you know it's that time again – time to trim the toenails. Trimming your dog's nails is not just a part of grooming; it's important for your pet's health as well. You should remember that untrimmed nails can cause a variety of problems including broken nails, which are painful and can bleed profusely.  

spacer-green.gifAnal Sac Expression

Commonly called 'anal glands', the anal sacs are two small pouches located on either side of the anus at approximately the four o'clock and eight o'clock positions. Numerous specialized sebaceous (sweat) glands that produce a foul smelling secretion line the walls of the sacs. Each sac is connected to the outside by a small duct that opens just inside the anus.


The secretion acts as a territorial marker - a dog's 'calling card'. The sacs are present in both male and female dogs and some of the secretion is squeezed out onto the feces by muscular contractions when the dog defecates. This is why dogs are so interested in smelling one another's feces.

The first sign is often scooting or dragging the rear along the ground may indicate a problem with the anal sacs. There may be excessive licking or biting, often at the root of the tail rather than the anal area. Anal sac disease is very painful. Even normally gentle dogs may snap or growl if you touch the tail or anus when they have anal sac disease. If the anal sac ruptures, you may see blood or pus draining from the rectum.